University of Innsbruck

SCHWARTZ Lab

HYBRID SYSTEMS AS REMOTE CONTROLLABLE FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS

Our research focuses on the systematic design of two- or even multi-component systems consisting of photoactive molecules and porous host materials.

The resulting hybrid systems exhibit e.g., solid state photochromism and solvatochromism or luminescence, which are of broad interest for technologically relevant applications such as sensors, data storage memory devices etc.. Additionally, we further develop an analytical work-flow to completely understand the occurring properties of the overall material as a function of structure. Here, several methods such as X-ray powder diffraction, liquid- and solid-state NMR, IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are applied.

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Research

Hybrid Systems as remote controllable functional materials

One point of focus is materials design on a systematic level by adjusting host and guest structures, varying the degree of loading and to design multi-component systems with selectively stimulable individuals. Currently, we focus on switch@MOF systems with photochromic dyes as guest molecules and so-called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as host scaffolds. By the creation of a materials´ bibliography, compounds with specific functionalities are selected to be further implemented in thin films and to be exploited in terms of selective uptake and release of e.g., gases, hydrogen storage as a function of irradiation, optical characteristics, or conduction, just to name a few.

The second point of focus is the development of an analyzation procedure to understand the occurring optical/electrical characteristics in the non- and irradiated state from a structural point of view. Furthermore, possible positional re-arrangement of the freely mobile guest(s) within the porous hosts during light irradiation will be traced, which is a challenging task for solid state materials. Notably, the resulting analyzation procedure will not be limited to switch@MOF systems but can be transferred to any composite material of either partially amorphous or totally amorphous nature.