University of Innsbruck

Lev­er­ag­ing Ethics to Make Quan­tum Research Sus­tain­able

Innsbruck is a leading center in the development of new quantum technologies. In order to understand the processes of societal change triggered by these technologies and to be able to develop corresponding ethics frameworks, the University of Innsbruck is founding today the Innsbruck Quantum Ethics Lab (IQEL), in which experts from various disciplines will work together.

Statis­tics: Brazil is the clear favourite going into the FIFA World Cup

After being eliminated in the quarter-finals four years ago, the Brazilian national team is once again the clear favourite to win the FIFA World Cup. But Argentina, the Netherlands, Germany and France also have a good chance of winning the title – as shown by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Innsbruck, Ghent and Luxembourg and the Technical Universities of Dortmund and Munich.

Method to char­ac­ter­ize large quan­tum com­put­ers

Quantum devices are becoming ever more complex and powerful. Researchers at the University of Innsbruck, in collaboration with the Johannes Kepler University Linz and the University of Technology Sydney, are now presenting a method to characterize even large quantum computers using only a single measurement setting.

Ultra-cold mini twisters

A team of quantum physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, led by three-time ERC laureate Francesca Ferlaino has established a new method to observe vortices in dipolar quantum gases. These quantum vortices are considered a strong indication of superfluidity, the frictionless flow of a quantum gas, and have now been experimentally detected for the first time in dipolar gases.

New form of uni­ver­sal quan­tum com­put­ers

Computing power of quantum machines is currently still very low. Increasing it is still proving to be a major challenge. Physicists at the University of Innsbruck now present a new architecture for a universal quantum computer that overcomes such limitations and could be the basis of the next generation of quantum computers soon.

Meet the locals: Teatime in the Botan­i­cal Gar­den

Social events for international researchers and professionals are periodically organised by the Welcome Service Tyrol team of the Standortagentur (Business Location Agency). These very popular meetings, whether it is a small get-together or the big autumn event for the whole family with a guided tour at the Alpenzoo, offer a great opportunity to network with other internationals and newcomers to Tyrol in a pleasant atmosphere.

Build an advanced Euro­pean quan­tum inter­net ecosys­tem

The Quantum Internet Alliance has started a seven-year program to build an innovative Quantum Internet ecosystem in Europe. The first phase has a budget of 24 million euros. The research groups led by Tracy Northup and Benjamin Lanyon at the Department of Experimental Physics of the University of Innsbruck and the quantum computer spin-off AQT will be involved in the project.

Promi­nent researchers’ work gets pub­lished more eas­ily

Research work by renowned researchers is rated significantly better than work by lesser-known researchers, despite the same quality. This was the conclusion reached by a team of researchers led by Jürgen Huber from the Department of Banking and Finance in a recently published study. The collaboration of Vernon Smith, winner of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics, was crucial to the success of the study.

Migra­tion as moral­ity pol­i­tics

Migration often serves as an arena for conflicting values. In this context, religious groups, civil society organisations and local authorities often show a more liberal attitude than the state. The political scientist Julia Mourão Permoser applies a new analytical approach to this as yet unexplored aspect.

COVID-19: The current semester

For the University of Innsbruck, the health of all university employees remains a top priority! The Rector's team is concerned to protect staff and students at the University from possible Corona infections as best as possible. In this article we inform you about the measures taken in connection with the Covid 19 pandemic. Please inform yourself regularly and adhere to the safety measures and hygiene guidelines. 

 

IMC 2022: 800 moun­tain researchers met in Inns­bruck

From 11 to 15 September, the University of Innsbruck hosted the second International Mountain Conference, the world's largest conference exclusively on mountain issues. Over the course of four days, numerous experts from a wide range of disciplines engaged in an interdisciplinary exchange on various aspects of mountain research. The organizers Wolfgang Gurgiser and Stefan Mayr from the University of Innsbruck’s Research Area "Mountain regions" sum up the conference positively and are considering a next edition of the IMC in 2025.

Read­ing old hand­writ­ing with Tran­skribus

Using artificial intelligence, computers can decipher handwritten texts and make them readable for everyone. The Transkribus platform, co-developed at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, makes this technology available to scholars and the general public. An ever-growing group of people are using Transkribus to research their family history. On 29 and 30 September 2022, users from all over the world are going to meet in Innsbruck.

Stud­ies show­case long-term effects of drought

With the effects of climate change underway, drought is becoming an increasing problem in many parts of the world. Michael Bahn, researcher from the Department of Ecology at the University of Innsbruck, was involved in several studies on the impact of drought on ecosystems. These give insight into the complex processes and highlight the importance of biodiversity in enabling natural systems to resist drought.

The role of reli­gion in the Rus­sian “cul­ture war”

In recent years, the Russian Orthodox Church has tried to become an international influencer propagating conservative moral values. This is the research finding of Kristina Stoeckl, a sociologist of religion. Following Russia's attack on Ukraine, many religiously inspired right-wing groups distanced themselves from Moscow at least for the time being. It remains to be seen whether this rejection will be long term.

Hannes Pich­ler wins New Hori­zons in Physics Prize

Quantum physicist Hannes Pichler receives a highly endowed research prize. He will be awarded a New Horizons Prize in Physics at the Breakthrough Prize Awards Ceremony. The $100,000 award is given to early-career scientists who have already made a significant impact on their field.

Astro­physics: Star-child­hood shapes stel­lar evo­lu­tion

In classical models of stellar evolution, so far little importance has been attached to the early evolution of stars. Thomas Steindl from the Department of Astro- and Particle Physics at the University of Innsbruck now shows for the first time that the biography of stars is indeed shaped by their early stage. The study was published in Nature Communications.

The ELI-Hub Award 2022 goes to Aus­tria

The Austrian Hub is delighted about receiving the Annual Hub Award of the European Law Institute. With this prize, the ELI honours a Hub every year that has made a special contribution to the goals of the European Law Institute.

Cli­mate change threat­ens ice caves in Aus­tria

Eight ice caves in four Austrian federal states: A team of geologists from the University of Innsbruck has comprehensively documented the loss and gain of ice in Alpine ice caves over the last 2000 years for the first time. The geologist Tanguy Racine warns: The ice of smaller caves especially is in danger of disappearing in the near future and with it a valuable climate archive. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Ris­ing slopes: Moun­tain research 1900–2019

Analysis of 200,000 scientific papers over 120 years shows the evolution of mountain research

Mountain regions provide direct livelihoods for up to one million people, and crucial resources for a significant proportion of the Earth’s population. Yet these regions are strongly influenced by intensifying climate change, growing demand for resources, increasing tourism, and many other forces. Research activities that consider the particularities of the world’s diverse mountain regions are essential to understand their resilience to changes and to detect emerging or increasing risks that threaten mountain environments and settlements.

Boost­ing the sin­gle pho­ton rate for quan­tum com­mu­ni­ca­tion

A new experiment performed at the University of Innsbruck in collaboration with researchers from Bayreuth, Dortmund, Münster, and Linz allows to double the information transfer rate in future quantum communication systems with the SUPER method.

Super­con­duct­ing diode with­out mag­netic field in mul­ti­layer graphene

Superconductors are the key to lossless current flow. However, the realization of superconducting diodes has only recently become an important topic of fundamental research. An international research team involving the theoretical physicist Mathias Scheurer has now succeeded in reaching a milestone:  the demonstration of an extremely strong superconducting diode effect in a single two-dimensional superconductor. They report on this in Nature Physics.

Sus­tain­able teach­ing part­ner­ship with Swarovski Water­school

Since the beginning of July, the UNO-Innsbruck International Summer School, organized by the University of New Orleans, has once again taken place at the University of Innsbruck. For students on the International Management and Communication courses, one of the most successful companies in Tyrol was at the center of teaching for one week: Swarovski and in particular the Swarovski Waterschool - a global educational initiative of the company.

Under­stand­ing Cli­mate Research from Caves

The University of Innsbruck Quaternary Research Group recently hosted the international conference "Climate Change The Karst Record IX (KR9)" in Innsbruck and online. Around 200 participants from all over the world attended the conference from 17 to 21 July.

A roadmap for the future of quan­tum sim­u­la­tion

A roadmap for the future direction of quantum simulation has been set out in Nature this week. An international team of researchers, among them Innsbruck physicists Peter Zoller and Christian Kokail explore near and medium-term possibilities for quantum simulation on analogue and digital platforms.

Repro­ducibil­ity is the best pre­dic­tor of gen­er­al­iz­abil­ity

An international team of researchers was recently able to show that research results from the field of strategic management in some cases generalizes to new time periods and new geographies. The decisive criterion for this is the reproducibility of a study: studies whose results can be obtained again using the same data also tend to generalize to new times and places. They also find that independent scientists are able to forecast which results would be supported in new tests.

Quan­tum com­puter works with more than zero and one

For decades computers have been synonymous with binary information – zeros and ones. Now a team at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, realized a quantum computer that breaks out of this paradigm and unlocks additional computational resources, hidden in almost all of today’s quantum devices.

A clear shot into the cen­ter of the Milky Way

Nadeen B. Sabha from the University of Innsbruck is the first astrophysicist in Austria to lead a research project at the new James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Together with an international team, she wants to detect very young stars at the center of our Galaxy. Although the birth of stars near a black hole is very unlikely and requires very special conditions, there is evidence for their existence in the center of the Milky Way.

Inva­sive fish: Sperm hijack­ing as suc­cess strat­egy

The Prussian carp is considered one of the most successful invasive fish species in Europe. An international research team led by Dunja Lamatsch from the Research Institute of Limnology, Mondsee, has now described its complete genome for the first time. This provides a much better understanding of the prussian carp's peculiar and efficient reproductive method.

The Hippo and the Hydra

A new study describes the development of the body axis in the immortal freshwater polyp Hydra. It is controlled by the so-called Hippo signaling pathway, which, among other functions, ensures that our organs do not continue to grow indefinitely. The Department of Zoology at the University of Innsbruck was significantly involved in the research and provided important data.

ERC Start­ing Grant for quan­tum physi­cist Martin Ring­bauer

Austrian Quantum physicist Martin Ringbauer has been awarded a Starting Grant by the European Research Council (ERC) for his experimental research on new approaches for quantum information processing. The grant, endowed with around 1.5 million euros, is the highest award for successful young scientists in Europe.

A mir­ror tracks a tiny par­ti­cle

Sensing with levitated nanoparticles has so far been limited by the precision of position measurements. Now, researchers at the University of Innsbruck led by Tracy Northup, have demonstrated a new method for optical interferometry in which light scattered by a particle is reflected by a mirror. This opens up new possibilities for using levitated particles as sensors, in particular, in quantum regimes.

Ensur­ing resilient dig­i­tal democ­racy after the pan­demic

Together with 13 other universities, the University of Innsbruck has been awarded a €3 million project to research the big question of how Europe's societies can become more resilient after the pandemic. Matthias Kettemann and his team at the Department for Theory and Future of Law will lead a work package on digital communication.