Universität Innsbruck

A Quan­tum Video Reel

When it comes to creating ever more intriguing quantum systems, a constant need is finding new ways to observe them in a wide range of physical scenarios.  JILA Fellow Cindy Regal and JILA and NIST Fellow Ana Maria Rey have teamed up with Oriol Romero-Isart from the University of Innsbruck and IQOQI to show that a trapped particle in the form of an atom readily reveals its full quantum state with quite simple ingredients, opening up opportunities for studies of the quantum state of ever larger particles.

Under­ly­ing assump­tions of air qual­ity need to be rede­fined

Long-term measurements in the urban area of Innsbruck, Austria, show that the fraction of ozone near the surface tends to be overestimated in atmospheric models. Consequently, a fundamental assumption for air quality forecasting has to be reinterpreted for urban areas. Measurements by an international team led by atmospheric scientist Thomas Karl of the University of Innsbruck also show that direct nitrogen dioxide emissions are overestimated.

Anton Zeilinger awarded hon­orary doc­tor­ate

Today, quantum physicist Anton Zeilinger was awarded an honorary doctorate in the Aula auditorium of the University of Innsbruck. The Nobel Prize winner of 2022 was honored for his outstanding scientific achievements. Zeilinger was a professor at the Department of Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck from 1990 to 1999, where he carried out much of the work recently honored with the Nobel Prize.

Blast Chiller for the Quan­tum World

The quantum nature of objects visible to the naked eye is currently a much-discussed research question. A team led by Innsbruck physicist Gerhard Kirchmair has now demonstrated a new method in the laboratory that could make the quantum properties of macroscopic objects more accessible than before. With the method, the researchers were able to increase the efficiency of an established cooling method by an order of a magnitude.

Quan­tum entan­gle­ment sharp­ens mea­sure­ments

According to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, two complementary properties, for example single components of a magnetic field, cannot be determined with arbitrary precision at the same time. An international team of scientists has now tested a new method on about a dozen quantum computers with which multiple parameters can be optimally determined simultaneously using entangled copies of a quantum state.

Inter­na­tional experts intro­duce new mas­ter's degree in phar­macy

Since the winter semester 2022/23, the University of Innsbruck and the Medical University of Innsbruck offer the joint master's programme "Pharmaceutical Sciences". International experts from industry and regulatory authorities were guests at the kick-off.

Dig­i­tal infor­ma­tion plat­form for refugees

At the International Conference on Information Systems ICIS 2022 in Copenhagen, Maximilian Schreieck from the Department of Information Systems, Production Management and Logistics has been awarded the AIS Impact Award for his support of digital solutions for refugees.

Heat and cold as health haz­ards

Both hot and cold environments trigger a stress response in the human body and can lead to cardiovascular problems. Physiologist Justin Lawley from the Department of Sport Science and colleagues have recently investigated both factors in scientific studies. The results, which were published in the Journals Scientific Reports and Experimental Physiology, are especially interesting in light of the current multiple global crises.

Lev­er­ag­ing Ethics to Make Quan­tum Research Sus­tain­able

Innsbruck is a leading center in the development of new quantum technologies. In order to understand the processes of societal change triggered by these technologies and to be able to develop corresponding ethics frameworks, the University of Innsbruck is founding today the Innsbruck Quantum Ethics Lab (IQEL), in which experts from various disciplines will work together.

Statis­tics: Brazil is the clear favourite going into the FIFA World Cup

After being eliminated in the quarter-finals four years ago, the Brazilian national team is once again the clear favourite to win the FIFA World Cup. But Argentina, the Netherlands, Germany and France also have a good chance of winning the title – as shown by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Innsbruck, Ghent and Luxembourg and the Technical Universities of Dortmund and Munich.

Method to char­ac­ter­ize large quan­tum com­put­ers

Quantum devices are becoming ever more complex and powerful. Researchers at the University of Innsbruck, in collaboration with the Johannes Kepler University Linz and the University of Technology Sydney, are now presenting a method to characterize even large quantum computers using only a single measurement setting.

Ultra-cold mini twisters

A team of quantum physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, led by three-time ERC laureate Francesca Ferlaino has established a new method to observe vortices in dipolar quantum gases. These quantum vortices are considered a strong indication of superfluidity, the frictionless flow of a quantum gas, and have now been experimentally detected for the first time in dipolar gases.

New form of uni­ver­sal quan­tum com­put­ers

Computing power of quantum machines is currently still very low. Increasing it is still proving to be a major challenge. Physicists at the University of Innsbruck now present a new architecture for a universal quantum computer that overcomes such limitations and could be the basis of the next generation of quantum computers soon.

Meet the locals: Teatime in the Botan­i­cal Gar­den

Social events for international researchers and professionals are periodically organised by the Welcome Service Tyrol team of the Standortagentur (Business Location Agency). These very popular meetings, whether it is a small get-together or the big autumn event for the whole family with a guided tour at the Alpenzoo, offer a great opportunity to network with other internationals and newcomers to Tyrol in a pleasant atmosphere.

Build an advanced Euro­pean quan­tum inter­net ecosys­tem

The Quantum Internet Alliance has started a seven-year program to build an innovative Quantum Internet ecosystem in Europe. The first phase has a budget of 24 million euros. The research groups led by Tracy Northup and Benjamin Lanyon at the Department of Experimental Physics of the University of Innsbruck and the quantum computer spin-off AQT will be involved in the project.

Promi­nent researchers’ work gets pub­lished more eas­ily

Research work by renowned researchers is rated significantly better than work by lesser-known researchers, despite the same quality. This was the conclusion reached by a team of researchers led by Jürgen Huber from the Department of Banking and Finance in a recently published study. The collaboration of Vernon Smith, winner of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economics, was crucial to the success of the study.