University of Innsbruck

Jes­sika Arm­brüs­ter

Training

  • October 2014 – January 2018: bachelor of arts in archaeology at Innsbruck University, focus on classical archaeology, thesis "Tumuli at Athens‘ Kerameikos. Monumental Tumui as Markers of Political Representation"
  • October 2015 – October 2019: bachelor of arts in Classica et Orientalia at Innsbruck University, focus on ancient near East archaeology and ancient Oriental philology, thesis "Finding Context of Greek Imported Ceramics in East Georgia"
  • October 2018 – April 2021: master of arts in archaeology at Innsbruck University, focus on classical and ancient near East archaeology, thesis "The Early Hellenistic Two-Room House Between the Aphrodite Temple and the Late Archaic House on Monte Iato Around 300 BC"
  • Since July 2021: doctoral studies, focus on archaeology, thesis "From Compound to Peristyle: Development Processes of Rural Settlements From the 4th to 2nd century BC in the Mediterranean"

Academic Career

  • March 2018 – September 2018: student member of staff in research and organisation at the department for ancient history and ancient near Eastern Studies at Innsbruck University, working for Univ.-Prof. Dr. Robert Rollinger
  • July 2019 – February 2021: student member of staff in research and organisation at the department for archaeology at Innsbruck University, working for Univ.-Prof. Dr. Erich Kistler
  • November 2019 – September 2020: student member of staff in research and organisation at the department for archaeology at Innsbruck University at FZ AWOSA
  • October 2020 – April 2021: student project member of staff at the department for archaeology at Innsbruck University, FWF Projekt P304780 "Between Aphrodite-Temple and the late archaic House III"
  • May 2021 – September 2021: scientific project member of staff at the department for archaeology at Innsbruck Universty, FWF Projekt P304780 "Between Aphrodite-Temple and the late archaic House III"
  • Since Oktober 2021: scientific project member of staff at the department for archaeology at Innsbruck University, FWF Projekt P34941 "The Parochial City at Hellenistic Monte Iato and the World beyond Peristyle House 1"
  • Since July 2022: member of staff at the FWF WKP project (WKP 151) "Narrating Consumption Landscapes Between Modernity and Traditionalism. A Virtual Encounter with the Archaic Monte Iato, Sicily (6th/ 5th century BC)"

Focuses at Work

  • Transformation processes during the “Hellenization” of the Mediterranean
  • Adaption and appropriation of Greek elements in indigenous settings focusing on the significance and function in domestic architecture
  • Settlement morphology of the 4th – 2nd century BC

Lectures and Publications

Scholarships

  • 2018 – 2019: scholarship rewarding good performance given by Innsbruck University
  • 2021: scholarship to foster studies given by Innsbruck University

Other Commitments

  • Student representation for Classica et Orientalia
  • Member in the junior staff work group "Archaeological Research on Sicily"

Dissertation Project

Working title: "From Compound to Peristyle: Development Processes of Rural Settlements From the 4th to 2nd century BC in the Mediterranean"

Up until Alexander the Great’s successors the Greek world became larger and larger reaching out even into the land of the so-called barbarians. What is called urbanisation is connected with this Greek expansion. This term encompasses not only newly founded apoikiai alongside the coastline of the Mediterranean but also settlements in the near and distant hinterland. These rear parts experienced an extensive reorganisation during the 4th and 3rd century BC.   The apoikiai’s influence on local indigenous populations increased as they managed to consolidate their power. As a result of these exchanges between global and local worlds many settlements that had had a primitive level before began to erect urban elements such as town walls, regularly planned streets, agorai, theatres or representative buildings like the peristyle house. Thus, an identity regarding Greek culture is signalled towards others. One has to bear in mind, however, that both the polis model and the Greek way of life were not taken over despite urban features citing Greek elements were used. Moreover, only selected elements seem to have been imitated as the various different levels of hellenisation of hinterland settlements prove. It needs to be assessed in depth under which circumstances each element was appropriated und adapted to each social and cultural need. Deviating expressions of adaptions enable conclusions on different social structures. Alterations in these structures can be traced excellently via domestic buildings. They stand at the core of this dissertation as they mirror changes within basic desires and social practices.
In order to analyse processes that stand behind this construction of Greek identity facing towards others both material remains and textual evidence are to be used, for the latter often paints another picture of society as the former. This approach is to be enriched by sociological and sociocultural considerations based on architecture.