Winter Semester Bachelor's Courses

Content:
To get to know the basics of digital technology, the students are first introduced to the calculation rules of digital technology (switching algebra), the number representation in digital as well as the combinatorial logic. Subsequently, the mediation of the structure and the operation of a digital switching network follows, whereupon such is constructed and optimized. Another topic of the lecture is in digital circuits with semiconductor memories, whereat the construction of memory elements is considered in more detail. In addition, the students will deal with the theory of automata as well as with the implementation of digital components in CMOS technology. Students will further gain an overview of D/A and A/D converters and become familiar with related parameters and implementation examples. The course is held in German.
Application of the course content in practice:
Countless modern technologies are based on digital electronic circuits. For example, signal processing is the basis for the recording, transmission and storage of image, sound and film. Another application area of digital technology is the automation technology which is for instance used in the production of large series and thus represents the basis for industrialization. In that way, workers can be relieved of dangerous and tedious routine work and at the same time the product's quality is improved. In the exercises, there is an introduction of microprocessors. These are no longer used exclusively in PCs nowadays but in almost all technical devices. This multiplicity of applications results in a high degree of specialization of the microprocessors which additionally have to get along with as little energy as possible in nowadays. In the corresponding exercises, the students independently design and optimize digital circuits.
Lecturers and examination modality: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Ußmüller, Dipl.-Ing. Manuel Ferdik, Michael Renzler (PhD), Dipl.-Ing. Georg Saxl, written exam, additional points for the written exam can be acquired through presenting own calculations in the exercises.

Summer Semester Master's Courses

Content:
In this course, students will get an overview of implantable systems. First, the operating principle of active and passive implants are conveyed, and their similarities and differences are highlighted by a classification. Another very current topic of the lecture is Wearable Devices, whose technology is compared with that of implants. In the second part of the course, the data transfer to implants is treated. There is a subdivision into optical, acoustic transmission and radio transmission (near and far field). In this context, students are introduced to telemedicine, with information and communication technologies supporting health care in the form of data transmission. The third part of the course deals with the energy management of implantable systems, i.e. different types of energy storage and energy harvesting. The possibilities for energy harvesting include photovoltaics, thermoelectronic generators, kinetic energy and inductive energy transfer. Another focus of the lecture is the challenge of low-power concepts, differentiating between digital and analogue low-power concepts. The course is held in German.

Application of the course content in practice:
Countless modern technologies are based on digital electronic circuits. For example, signal processing is the basis for the recording, transmission and storage of image, sound and film. Another application area of digital technology is the automation technology which is for instance used in the production of large series and thus represents the basis for industrialization. In that way, workers can be relieved of dangerous and tedious routine work and at the same time the product's quality is improved. In the exercises, there is an introduction of microprocessors. These are no longer used exclusively in PCs nowadays but in almost all technical devices. This multiplicity of applications results in a high degree of specialization of the microprocessors which additionally have to get along with as little energy as possible in nowadays. In the corresponding exercises, the students independently design and optimize digital circuits
Lecturer and examination modality Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Ußmüller, Dipl.-Ing. Manuel Ferdik, Michael Renzler (PhD), Dipl.-Ing. Georg Saxl, written exam, additional points for the written exam can be acquired through presenting own calculations in the exercises.

Winter Semester Master's Courses

Content:
For the in-depth understanding of wireless radio communication and sensor technology, the basics of high-frequency technology (scattering parameters, Smith charts, and wave propagation in the conductor) will first be conveyed in this lecture, followed by a discussion of the high-frequency behavior of active components. Another topic is the structure and the fields of application of transmitter-receiver architectures. In addition, low-noise preamplifiers (LNA) and power amplifiers, mixers, oscillators and phase-locked loops are treated. The course is held in German.
Application of the course content in practice:
After completing the course, the students understand the influence of individual components on the overall system and are able to set up high-frequency systems. Radio communication is used in many companions of our everyday life, including mobile devices, WLAN, Bluetooth, GPS, non-contact measurement techniques and radar. The radar technology is used for example in airport radars and adaptive cruise control (ACCs).
Lecturer and examination modality: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Ußmüller, oral exam, appointment by arrangement
Content:
In this course, students will learn the best way to design integrated circuits (Best Practice of a Circuit Layout). They get to know the development process as well as important verification steps of integrated analog and digital circuits. Furthermore, active and passive components and their production in integrated circuits are discussed. Subsequently, the test of integrated circuits will be thematized. In addition, students will be made aware of protection mechanisms against static electricity and will be given an overview of various packaging technologies. The course is held in German.
Appliation of the course content in practice:
In the exercise of this course, the structure and the application of integrated circuits takes place. The students learn about the entire process chain from design to the processing and application of chips. Numerous videos and practical applications presented in the course illustrate the high relevance of the topic.
Lecturer and examination modality: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Thomas Ußmüller, oral exam, appointment by arrangement
Content:
At the beginning of the course, the physical basics (from the atom to the crystal lattice: band model, electrical properties) of semiconductors are treated. Subsequently, students get to know the operating principle of semiconductors' electrical components as well as possibilities for targeted influencing of semiconductors. A particular attention is given to diodes, bipolar transistors and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET). The course is held in German.
Appliation of the course content in practice:
Semiconductors and semiconductor devices are used, for example, in integrated circuits (ICs, microprocessors, microcontrollers), solar cells, optoelectronics (LEDs, CCD sensors) and therefore are an integral part of our modern day-to-day life. In the exercises, examples of basic properties of semiconductor devices are calculated.
Lecturer and examination modality: Michael Renzler (PhD), oral exam, appointment by arrangement
Content:
In this course, the students are comprehensively introduced to the Internet of Things (IoT). At the beginning, there will be a mediation of technological basics and an explanation of terms related to the intelligent networking of technical devices. The Internet of Things involves a change in holistic processes. For this reason, the course takes a closer look at the "Industry 4.0" organization concept with "Machine-to-Machine" communication. In addition, students will get to know other applications such as building automation and wireless sensor technology, before going on to develop "smart cities" including "smart grids". A major obstacle lies in the concrete realization of the networking of intelligent products and the handling of the large amount of data. For this reason, students are introduced to possible architectures and standards of the Internet of Things. The course is held in German.
Application of the course content in practice:
The Internet of Things will massively influence our everyday lives so in future we will live in Smart Homes located in Smart Cities. In addition, the Internet of Things in the context of Industry 4.0 leads to an increased efficiency of corporate production processes. The exercise part in which the students are supposed to independently carry out small projects, should clarify these circumstances. For example, the independent setup and programming of a sensor with cloud connection follows.
Lecturer and examination modality: Michael Renzler (PhD), grading is done via labroratory report of the project work.
Content:
The students are introduced to the prerequisites for electromagnetic compatibility. The basis for this is the knowledge of noise levels and sources of interference. It deals with coupling mechanisms and the handling of electromagnetic interference. Furthermore, passive interference suppression components and electromagnetic screens are treated and the students learn an EMW-compliant measuring technique and a corresponding circuit design. In the corresponding exercises, calculation examples and measurements in the EMC chamber are supposed to deepen the students' understanding for the matter.
Application of the course content in practice:
The design and development of electronic systems requires a thorough knowledge of the subject of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). According to VDE 0870, EMC is defined as the ability of an electrical device to function satisfactorily in its electromagnetic environment without affecting the environment and other equipment in an inadmissible way. Disturbing influences would be, for example, 50 Hz hum, earth loops, cross-talk and electrostatic discharges.
Lecturer and examination modality: Michael Renzler (PhD), oral exam, appointment by arrangement