University of Innsbruck

Überblick

Rina Alluri

Rina Malagayo Alluri,
Head of InnPeace

Unit for Peace and Conflict Studies

rina.alluri@uibk.ac.at

uibk.ac.at/peacestudies/alluri


1. Why is Peace and Conflict Research relevant in your field of study? ↓↑

I am a political scientist and international development scholar who has been raised and educated both in the Global North and the Global South. My mixed heritage and migration journeys have contributed to a deep desire to understand myself and the complex and diverse societies that we live in. The study of peace and conflict enables me to gain insight into how we can address structural disparities through critical education and practice.


2. Why are you part of InnPeace? ↓↑

InnPeace provide a research space where scholars and practitioners from different disciplinary backgrounds can come together to explore mutual interests related to how we can address conflicts in our society by exploring different forms of inner and outer peace. The research centre offers a space for joint events, publications and discussions on pertinent topics today.

Symbol image for the topic: Tatjana Schnell

Tatjana Schnell,
Deputy Head of InnPeace

Department of Psychology

tatjana.schnell@uibk.ac.at

Personal website


1. Why is Peace and Conflict Research relevant in your field of study? ↓↑

My field of study is existential psychology, with a special focus on life meaning. What people see as meaningful is highly subjective. For some, engagement for peace, tolerance, and equality are obviously meaningful. Others see radical action – and even violence – as the only viable way towards what they find meaningful. When trying to gain insight into people’s life worlds, it is crucially important to understand what they value as meaningful, and if they fear that this might be desecrated by others.


2. Why are you part of InnPeace? ↓↑

The team of InnPeace advocates for a balanced and empirically grounded concept of peace. It takes into account individual and group goals, attitudes and values, but also acknowledges transrational factors that influence personal and organisational mood and action. Accordingly, the concept is non-normative, but open to subjective understandings of peace and to their cultural embeddedness. It is here that research on meaning and peace can cross-fertilise: to support a worldview that gives credit to the plurality of viewpoints, the necessity to understand what people actually mean by their actions and words, and to thus strengthen the visibility of our common humanity.

See all members ↓↑

Pia Andreatta

Department of Psychosocial Intervention and Communication

e-mail | Website

Vera Brandner

Department of Sociology

e-mail

Rocío Cachada Dibuja

Department of Media, Society and Communication

e-mail

Herbert Dietrich

Department of Psychology

e-mail

Lena Drummer

Unit for Peace and Conflict Studies

e-mail | Website

Adham Hamed

Unit for Peace and Conflict Studies

e-mail | Website

Fatma Haron

Department of History and European Ethnology

e-mail | Website

Jennifer Hausberger

Department of Philosophy

e-mail | Website

Timo Heimerdinger

Department of History and European Ethnology

e-mail | Website

Sandra Heinsch-Kuntner

Department of Ancient History and Ancient Oriental Studies

e-mail | Website

Norbert Koppensteiner

Unit for Peace and Conflict Studies

e-mail | Website

Walter Kuntner

Department of Ancient History and Ancient Oriental Studies

e-mail

Martin Lang

Department of Ancient History and Ancient Oriental Studies

e-mail | Website

Andreas Maurer

Department of Political Science

e-mail | Website

Andreas Oberprantacher

Department of Philosophy

e-mail | Website

Walter Obwexer

Department of European Law and Public International Law

e-mail | Website

Sabrina Stein

Unit for Peace and Conflict Studies

e-mail | Website

Dirk Rose

Department of German Studies

e-mail

Dirk Rupnow

Department of History and European Ethnology

e-mail | Website

Bernadette Voetter

Department of Psychology

e-mail



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