Portraits

In this section, we present researchers from Innsbruck specializing in Canadian studies or collaborating closely with Canadian colleagues and institutions.
Canadianists portrayed so far:

  


 

Michael Flach

 

 

Michael Flach is a civil engineer with a great passion for timber construction and ecological building. A guest professorship as well as numerous lectures and projects brought him to Canada.

 

 

Michael Flach studied civil engineering at the Technical University of Munich with a special focus on timber construction. In 1978, he finished his studies as a graduate engineer for civil engineering and continued his education at the Centre des Hautes Études de la Construction in Paris, with a focus on steel and pre-stressed concrete. He completed his studies as a graduate engineer in France in 1979. In 1988, he founded his own engineering office for timber construction together with the wood expert Julius Natterer. He was also co-founder of Cantercel, an experimental site for architecture in the south of France, and taught at the schools of architecture of Lyon, Grenoble, and Montpellier. In 2002, he returned to Austria to implement a chair for timber construction at Innsbruck University. For the past five years, he has also been teaching at the University of Corsica.

He earned his reputation as a timber specialist with wide-span or complex timber constructions, 60 of which have been awarded timber construction prizes. His round tree house in Cantercel, which brings to mind the idea of a Hobbit house, is very popular among visitors and has won several awards.

Many things connect Michael Flach with Canada, including his multicultural Anglo-French background: At the age of six, he lived in Atlanta and entered school there. Since 1997, he has been to Canada regularly, has held a guest professorship at the UBC in Vancouver and has given numerous lectures in Ottawa, Quebec, and Toronto. In 2002, he gave his first keynote presentation at the World Conference on Timber Engineering WCTE in Whistler. Later on in his career, he was the structural engineer of the Austria House for the 2010 Winter Olympics, and several of the best timber construction specialists in Canada – such as Caroline Frenette, David Moses, Robert Malczyk, and Eric Karsh – went through his school while working with him.

His commitment to energy-efficient construction is another link to Canada, where the first house based on the principle of the passive house had been built long before it was named after the Innsbruck University professor Wolfgang Feist. With the Austria House in Whistler, the passive house in solid wood construction ‘came back to Canada’ so to speak, where it received the Wood Innovation Award in 2010.

His most recent work is a renovated farm in the Gschnitztal valley in Tyrol, a multi-generational house with his children and grandchildren in passive house design, of course, and with his famous spatial tree structures, because in his retirement he prefers to live in organic forms rather than in rectangular boxes.  

Website: www.Arbohaus.com

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Eva-Maria Müller

 

 

Eva-Maria Müller is a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of American Studies. She maintains academic contacts with researchers at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, mainly within the field of Mountain Studies, and is committed to establishing networks between emerging scholars from Canada and Central Europe.


 

Eva-Maria Müller's academic career is driven by an interest in cultural studies that focuses on the relationship between the human and non-human world. This interest, which began during an AFS exchange year in Australia, on the coast of the Great Barrier Reef, was first pursued with a degree in English and Biology (teaching profession) at the LFU. After graduation (and after a digression into academic management at the Medical University of Innsbruck), she developed a dissertation project in the field of interdisciplinary Mountain Studies. Her academic relations with Canada begin with this project. It examines works of Canadian and Austrian literature in terms of their role in mountain tourism and was conceptualized during a doctoral fellowship at the Canadian Centre for Austrian and Central European Studies (Wirth Institute) at the University of Alberta. In Edmonton she worked in close contact with representatives of the former Canadian Mountain Studies Initiative, who specialized in the study of alpine spaces, not only from a natural science, but also from a cultural studies perspective.

The DFG-funded Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture at the University of Giessen, Germany, plays a similar pioneering role in interdisciplinary cultural studies research and it was in this context that Eva-Maria Müller further developed her dissertation project "Rewriting Alpine Orientalism: Lessons from the Canadian Rockies and Austrian Alps". She was subsequently accepted as a doctoral student in the Mellon-funded IGHERT consortium at the University of California Santa Cruz, the University Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the Australian National University. Eva-Maria Müller’s contacts to Canada were maintained through numerous research stays in archives and research institutions in Western Canada and through the ongoing exchange with the CSC in Innsbruck and the Centre of Canadian Studies in Marburg. In addition to numerous grants and awards, her research was also supported by the International Council for Canadian Studies for her contribution to Canadian Studies.

Eva-Maria Müller returned to her native mountains in 2019. Since 2020, she is a postdoctoral researcher in Christian Quendler's FWF project "Delocating Mountains" at the Department of American Studies. She is particularly interested in cinematic depictions of alpine regions beyond dominant summitting discourses, and engages in Canadian mediations of alpine descent from a postcolonial, feminist, and eco-critical perspective. Through Eva-Maria Müller's contacts with the University of Alberta, the project has been able to expand its academic network to include renowned Canadian mountain studies scholars.

Since 2016, Eva-Maria Müller – as a board member of the Wirth Alumni Network – has been committed to bringing emerging scholars from Canada and Central Europe together. The aim and mission of the network, which has its base at the CSC in Innsbruck (since 2018), is to establish itself as a Central European hub for academic and scientific activities between Canada and Central Europe. In her teaching, which was awarded the Stolzenberg Prize at the University of Giessen, Eva-Maria Müller continues to offer Canadian contents and uses the particular diversity and quality of Canadian natural and cultural spaces to convey postcolonial theories and eco-narratological approaches.

Homepage Eva-Maria Müller

Photo credits: Robin Peer

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  bernd-pelster


 

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Bernd Pelster is a tireless initiator of scientific cooperations with Canadian colleagues and institutions. He supports the Canadian Studies Centre with tremendous know-how and his diverse contacts in Canada.

 

 

 

For many years, O.-Univ.-Prof. Dr. Bernd Pelster has fostered scientific contacts and cooperations with Canadian colleagues and universities. Since 1996 he has held the chair in animal physiology at the Faculty of Biology’s Institute of Zoology at the University of Innsbruck. He began his academic career at the University of Münster (Westfälischen Wilhelms Universität) studying biology and sport sciences to become a teacher. He obtained his doctorate (Dr. rer. nat.) at the Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf in 1985 and completed his habilitation in the field of physiology at the Ruhr-University Bochum in 1992. In 1995 Prof. Pelster accepted a professorship at the University of Innsbruck. After leading the research group Biology of the, then, Faculty of Natural Sciences, he took over the position of Dean of the Faculty of Biology from 2004 to 2008.

Bernd Pelster’s relationship with Canada is diverse and started back in 1990, when he spent one year as Heisenberg-fellow, financed by the German Research Foundation (DFG), at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. During this time he established contacts with the Department of Biology at the Dalhousie-University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, spending several weeks there to study perspiration in amphibians.

In the years 1993 and 1995, visits of several weeks to the Department of Biology at the Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, followed, supported by the GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH. There, he researched buoyancy and swimbladder function in fish with Canadian colleagues, especially with Prof. Dr. W. R. Driedzic. The research was published jointly.

Further important contacts with the Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa were established, to investigate respiration regulation and ion regulation in fish. In the course of this cooperation, a master student was able to work in the lab of Prof. Dr. Steve Perry for several months, with the support of the Canadian Studies Centre. There was visa versa exchange as well: one of Prof. Perry’s students came to our lab in Innsbruck. By now, this cooperation has led to several joined publications. Another contact with the Department of Biology in Brandon, Manitoba, was established and Prof. Dr. P. Rombough spent a semester-long sabbatical in Innsbruck.

Over the past few years, a very fruitful cooperation with Prof. Dr. C. M. Wood of the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver was fostered. Joint studies on respiratory physiognomy and ion regulation in fish are conducted at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas in Manaus, Brasilia, and have led to a series of publications. The multitude of Prof. Pelster’s contacts in Canada, have also made him a regular referee for the Natural Sciences and Engeneering Research Council (NSERC).

Homepage Bernd Pelster

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tollinger

 


 

Prof. Dr. Martin Tollinger is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Canadian Studies Centre.




 

 

Martin Tollinger is Associate Professor at the Institute of Organic Chemistry at the University of Innsbruck since 2012. He studied chemistry at the University of Innsbruck and received his doctorate in 1999. He then joined the research laboratory of Prof. Lewis E. Kay at the University of Toronto as an Erwin Schrödinger fellow, where he worked in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Additionally, he was active in structural biology research at the SickKids Research Institute in Toronto during his stay in Canada.

He came back to Austria in 2004 - now with his family – to join the Institute for Biomolecular Structural Chemistry at the University of Vienna. An Erwin Schrödinger Return Fellowship of the Austrian Science Fund made his relocation possible. From 2006 to 2010, he worked as a university assistant at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna), where he habilitated in 2010 in biophysical chemistry and structural biology.

In his current research, Martin Tollinger works on the development of novel measurement methods of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and their application to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins with atomic resolution. Further focal points of his work are the investigation of the flexibility of these molecules and their interaction with pharmaceutically active substances. The combination of these experimental approaches enables an understanding of the functioning of the building blocks of life and is a suitable method for the optimization of potential active substances.

Through his several years of residence in Canada, Martin Tollinger has valuable contacts in the academic field, both at the University of Toronto and at other universities between Quebec and British Columbia. These enable the exchange of PhD students in joint research projects as well as the mutual use of existing infrastructures in the field of biophysical chemistry. In addition, regular visits of scientists take place in both directions and a further intensification of the cooperation with Canadian research institutes is planned.

Martin Tollinger has been a member of the advisory board of the Canadian Studies Centre at the University of Innsbruck since 2013. In this function, he acts as a contact person for students of pharmacy and chemistry.

Homepage Martin Tollinger

Publications Martin Tollinger

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Moser


The Romance philologist Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Ursula Moser is the initiator and founder as well as the current Director of the Canadian Studies Centre of Innsbruck, the first of its kind in Austria (1997).

Since the late 1980s, she has built strong academic tieswith numerous Canadian and especially Quebec universities. Not least of all for this reason, she was awarded the “Ordre des francophones d’Amérique” in 2012.

 

 

Ursula Moser was appointed to the Leopold-Franzens University of Innsbruck in 2002 where she holds a chair in French and Spanish Literatures at the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and earned her doctorate “sub auspiciis Praesidentis rei publicae” in French and English in 1976. Her attachment to America, however, had started long before. Her interest in cultural contact, in concepts of multiculturalism and transculturality, in minority situations and, above all, in their different and aesthetic manifestations in the francophone literatures of the Americas prompted her to go to Louisiana as early as 1983 and shortly afterwards to Québec. For many years the province of Quebec remained the centre of her research interests.

Ursula Moser’s research included Quebec poetry and prose, but also what is referred to in Quebec as “écriture au féminin”. She was one of the first to discover and introduce the Quebec concept of migrant literature into Romance Languages Studies in Europe. At the same time, she examined the generation of writers who, since the late 1970s, had come to Canada and Quebec from Latin America, but also from countries like Haiti. In 2004, she was the first non-Canadian to be awarded the renowned “Prix Jean Éthier-Blais de critique littéraire” for her monograph dedicated to the Haitian novelist Dany Laferrière. One year later, the International Council for Canadian Studies in Ottawa listed this book among the “30 best books of the last 30 years”.

In summer 2002, Ursula Moser taught as a visiting professor at the Université de Montréal and six years later, in 2008, at the University of Alberta where her research interests focused on the francophone literatures of Western Canada. For many years, she was on the editorial board of the bilingual International Journal of Canadian Studies and from 2008 to 2011 she served as its associate editor. At present, she is member of several committees for Canadian research awards and peer-reviewed journals (Canadian Literature, Globe: Revue internationale d’études québécoises, Études françaises, Voix et images, Alternative francophone, MuseMedusa). Since 2014, Ursula Moser has been an external evaluator of Quebec research centres for the Fonds de recherche du Québec (Société et culture). Her outstanding involvement in scientific research and her many cultural achievements earned her the “Ordre des francophones d’Amérique” in 2012. In 2010, she received the “Go for Gold” medal for her commitment to Austro-Canadian cooperation from the Canadian Ambassador in Vienna.

As to her experience in university and science management, Ursula Moser has devoted herself to promoting networking between institutions in Canada and in the German-speaking countries ever since the 1990s. In doing so, she has tried to act as a mediator between the two official languages English and French, an objective she still pursues as director of the Canadian Studies Centre in Innsbruck. From 1993 to 1995, she was vice president of the Association for Canadian Studies in German-speaking Countries (GKS), from 1995 to 1997 she was the association’s president. For more than 15 years, she chaired the liaison group set up by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research for the Canadian Centre for Austrian and Central European Studies (Wirth Institute) at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. Since 2006, she has been a member of the scientific boards of the Austro-Canadian Society in Vienna and of the Centre for Canadian Studies at the University of Graz. From 2008 to 2010, she was a member of the advisory committee of the Canadian Studies Institute at the University of Alberta and since 2011 she has been a research affiliate with the Canadian Literature Centre at the latter university.

Through her longstanding and continuing commitment, Ursula Moser has contributed significantly to the success not only of the Innsbruck Canadian Studies Centre, but also of the Centre d’étude de la chanson québécoise, the only European collection of recordings of francophone popular music from Northern America, which is affiliated with the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures of the University of Innsbruck. Besides, Ursula Moser is the editor of the book series canadiana oenipontana focusing on Canadian studies, with 12 published volumes to date. In her position as director of the Canadian Studies Centre, she has organized more than 20 interdisciplinary conferences on Canada-related topics.

Ursula Moser’s teaching interests also include Canada-related topics, and it is with enthusiasm that she takes her students on field trips to Quebec, Montreal and Ottawa. She is the contact person responsible for the academic exchange programs with the Université de Montréal, the CRÉPUQ and the University of Alberta, and even today she tries to spend as much time as possible in the country of her choice…

Homepage Ursula Moser (Mathis-Moser)

Publications Ursula Moser (Mathis-Moser)

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 Gregor Weihs


Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Gregor Weihs is a member of the scientific Advisory Board of the Canadian Studies Centre.

He has been teaching at the University of Innsbruck since2008. He is part of an ever expanding network of research collaborations and research projects established during his stay in Canada, the country he considers his “previous academic home”.


Gregor Weihs has been a professor of Photonics at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Innsbruck since 2008 and is still an associate of the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC). He received his diploma from the University of Innsbruck in 1994 and his doctorate “sub auspiciis Praesidentis rei publicae” (with Anton Zeilinger) from the University of Vienna in 2000, where he was appointed research assistant. From 2001 to 2004, he was a consulting assistant professor at Stanford University in California and a research fellow at the University of Tokyo. After his habilitation in experimental physics at the University of Vienna in 2005, he joined the Department for Physics and Astronomy and the IQC of the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, as an associate professor and was appointed to the Canada Research Chair in Quantum Photonics. He is a fellow in the Quantum Information Processing program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) and was awarded a Starting Grant by the European Research Council (ERC) in 2010.

His research focuses on quantum optics. Gregor Weihs has developed semiconductor-based devices such as integrated sources of entangled photon pairs for application in quantum communication. He has developed the first entanglement based free-space quantum key distribution system that was deployed across several buildings in Waterloo.

Gregor Weihs has strong connections with Canada both in his academic and in his private life. He lived in Canada with his wife and four children for four years and also has relatives there. Waterloo, Ontario, is probably best known as the home of the Blackberry. The city’s international reputation for research in physics is owed to Mike Lazaridis, the founder and, until recently, chairman of Blackberry, who has provided generous financial support in founding the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and the IQC. In cooperation with the IQC, student exchanges take place on a regular basis, and numerous cooperation projects, especially with the Professors Laflamme, Jennewein, and Resch, have been implemented. Most recently, a graduate student from Waterloo joined Professor Weihs’ research group in Innsbruck for two months.

As far as student mobility is concerned, Gregor Weihs actively and successfully contributed to the implementation of an EU-funded training program (TEP) focused on student exchange (2008-2011). It was signed by the universities of Calgary, Waterloo, Erlangen, Innsbruck, Paris Sud, the École Polytechnique, ENS Lyon, and Lithuania; in 2013, further universities joined the partnership. The CIFAR Quantum Information Processing program is a research network consisting of the best researchers in quantum information processing world-wide. They meet at regular intervals to discuss new challenges. Gregor Weihs is a member of this network, thus maintaining contacts with Canada’s most distinguished scientists in the field.

Homepage Gregor Weihs

Publications Gregor Weihs

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Manfred Husty

 

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Manfred Husty has been a member of the Canadian Studies Centre’s Advisory Board for many years. He is passionately dedicated to initiating scientific collaborations with Canadian colleagues and institutions. He supports the Canadian Studies Centre by his expertise and his impressive network of contacts with Canada.

 

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Manfred Husty has been a member of the Canadian Studies Centre’s Advisory Board for many years. He has demonstrated an ongoing commitment to fostering scientific collaborations with Canadian colleagues and universities. He has been a professor of geometry at the Faculty of Engineering Sciences (former Faculty of Civil Engineering) at the University of Innsbruck since September 2000. He started his academic career with a teaching degree in mathematics/geometry and sports science at the Karl-Franzens University of Graz, and he received his doctorate in 1983 from Technical University Graz. In 1989, he obtained his postdoctoral qualification (‘habilitation’) for geometry at the Montanuniversität Leoben. In 2000, he was appointed to the University of Innsbruck, where he held the position of dean of the faculty from 2004 to 2008.

Manfred Husty’s ties with Canada are longstanding and firm. Early in his career, he received the Erwin Schrödinger Fellowship of the Austrian Science Fund and spent one year at McGill University in Montreal as a research fellow – a powerful start at one of the best universities in North America. His work at the Centre for Intelligent Machines (CIM) led to a number of joint publications with Canadian colleagues, including Professor Paul Zsombor-Murray, with whom he has stayed in close contact both professionally and in his private life.1 One year later, he was elected an associate member of the CIM, where he not only served as an internal expert for Master’s and PhD theses, but also as a supervisor for students. He thus supervised John Hayes, who temporarily carried out his research at the Montanuniversität Leoben and who is a full professor at Carleton University (Ottawa) today.2 Manfred Husty continued to strengthen his relationships with Canadian scientists and universities in the following years. He lectured in Edmonton, Quebec, Victoria, Ottawa, and several times in Montreal. In 2009, he was eventually appointed visiting professor at the Université Laval in Quebec. He worked again in close cooperation with one of his colleagues – Professor Clément Gosselin – and his students (especially with M. Tale Masuleh), the results being a most significant research output.3

Whereas the University of Innsbruck has only few agreements with Canadian partner universities at the moment, Manfred Husty’s ongoing collaboration with Canadian colleagues still proves extremely fruitful (a five month research stay of a master student of Carleton University at the Faculty of Engineering Sciences in Innsbruck, co-organization of the International Conference on Geometry and Graphics ICCG in Montreal in 2012, etc.). Manfred Husty currently works on a book co-authored by Paul Zsombor-Murray which will be published by Springer. He is a member of the editorial board of the scientific journal Transactions of the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineers and is involved in a transnational project of the Austrian Science Fund with the Université Laval entitled “Algebraic Methods in Collision Detection and Path Planning”. After the project’s completion in 2014, the collaboration with Laval will continue and even be extended.

Manfred Husty has been a member of the Advisory Board of the Canadian Studies Centre in Innsbruck for many years and has supported the centre’s activities with enthusiasm and dedication. The centre benefits from the vast network of his innumerable contacts with Canadian universities and scientists.

Homepage Manfred Husty

Publications Manfred Husty

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1 1. F. Bulca, J. Angeles, P. J. Zsombor-Murray, and M. L. Husty. On the workspace of mechanisms. In Proc. 9th World Congress on the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, vol. 1, pages 75-79, Milano, Italy, 1995.
2. P. Zsombor-Murray, M. L. Husty, and D. Hartmann. Singular Stewart-Gough platforms with spherocylindrical and spheroconical hip joint trajectories. In Proc. 9thWorld Congress on the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms, vol. 3, pages 1886-1890, Milano, Italy, 1995.
3. P. Zsombor-Murray and M. L. Husty. Central line surface symmetries in 4-bar mechanisms. In Proc. 15th Canadian Congress of Applied Mechanics CANCAM, vol.1, pages 246-247, Victoria, Br. Columbia, Canada, 1995.
4. F. Bulca and M. L. Husty. Kinematic mapping of spherical three-legged platforms. In Proc. 15th Canadian Congress of Applied Mechanics CANCAM, vol.2, pages 874-875, Victoria, Br. Columbia, Canada, 1995.

 

2 Joint publications from that period:
1. P. Zsombor-Murray, M. J. D. Hayes, and M. L. Husty. Extreme distance to a spatial circle. CSME Transactions, 28(2A):221-235, 2004. Special issue: Selected Papers of the 2nd CCToMM Symposium on Mechanisms, Machines, and Mechatronics.
2. M. J. D. Hayes and M. L. Husty. On the kinematic constraint surfaces of general threelegged planar robots. Mechanism and Machine Theory, 38(5):379-394, 2003.
3. M. J. D. Hayes, M. L. Husty, and P. J. Zombor-Murray. Singular configurations of wristpartitioned 6R serial robots: a geometric perspective for users. CSME Transactions, 26, No. 1:41-55, 2002.
4. M. L. Husty and M. J. D. Hayes. Workspace characterization of planar three-legged platforms with holonomic higher pairs. In J. Lenarcic and M. M. Stanisic, editors, Advances in Robot Kinematics, pages 267-276. Kluwer Acad. Pub., 2000. ISBN 0-7923-6426-0.
5. M. L. Husty, M. J. D. Hayes, and H. Loibnegger. The general singularity surface of a planar three-legged platform. In A. Kecskemethy, M. Schneider, and C. Woernle, editors, Advances in Multibody Systems and Mechatronics, pages 203-214. Duisburg, 1999. ISBN 3-9501108-0-1.
6. M. L. Husty, P. J. Zombor-Murray, and P. Gervasi. Geometry in mechanics. In J. Lenarcic and M. L. Husty, editors, Advances in Robot Kinematics, pages 267-276. Kluwer Acad. Pub., 1998. ISBN 0-7923-5169-X.
7. M. J. D. Hayes, M. L. Husty, and P. Zsombor-Murray. Kinematic mapping of planar Stewart-Gough platforms. In Proceedings of CANCAM 1999, pages 319-320, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 1999.
8. M. J. D. Hayes, M. L. Husty, and P. Zsombor-Murray. Solving the forward kinematics of a planar 3-legged platform with holonomic higher pairs. In J. Angeles and Zakhariev, editors, NATO-ASI Workshop on Computational Methods in Mechanism Design, pages 525-535, Varna, Bulgaria, 1997.

 

3 1. M.T. Masouleh, C. Gosselin, M.L. Husty, and D. R Walter. Forward kinematic problem of 4-dof parallel mechanisms (3T1R) with identical limb structures acuated by revolute actuators using the linear implictization algorithm. In Proceedings of ASME DETC 2011, 2011.
2. M. T. Masouleh, D. R.Walter, M. L. Husty, and C. Gosselin. Forward kinematic problem of the symmetric 5-dof parallel mechanisms (3T2R) using the linear implictization algorithm. In Proceedings of the 13th World Congress in mechanism and machine science, 2011. http://www.somim.org.mx/conference_proceedings/pdfs/A7/A7_361.pdf.
3. M.T. Masouleh, M. L. Husty, and C. Gosselin. A general methodology for the forward kinematic problem of symmetrical parallel mechanisms and application for 5-PRUR parallel mechanisms (3T2R). In Proceedings of ASME DETC 2010, number 86261, 2010.
4. M.T. Masouleh, M. L. Husty, and C. Gosselin. Forward Kinematic Problem of 5-PRUR Parallel Mechanisms Using Study Parameters. In J. Lenarcic and M. M. Stanisic, editors, Advances in Robot Kinematics, pages 211-221. Springer, 2010.
5. M. L. Husty and C. Gosselin. On the singularity surface of planar 3-RPR parallel mechanisms. Mech. Based Design of Structures and Machines, 36:411-425, 2008.
6. M.T. Masouleh, C. Gosselin, M.L. Husty, and D. R Walter. Forward kinematic problem of 5-RPUR parallel mechanisms (3T2R) with identical limb structures. Mechanism and Machine Theory, 46(7):945 - 959, 2011.


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